Home > pronunciation of > pronunciation of error

Pronunciation Of Error

Contents

English–French French–English English–German German–English English–Indonesian Indonesian–English Semi-bilingual English–Arabic

Correct Pronunciation Of Error

English–Catalan English–Chinese (Simplified) English–Chinese (Traditional) English–Italian error american pronunciation English–Japanese English–Korean English–Malaysian English–Polish English–Portuguese English–Russian English–Thai English–Turkish English–Vietnamese Translate

Pronunciation Error Analysis

Grammar Log in English (UK) English (UK) English (US) Español Русский Português Deutsch Français Italiano err pronunciation 中文 (简体) 正體中文 (繁體) Follow us Log in English (UK) English (UK) English (US) Español Русский Português Deutsch Français Italiano 中文 (简体) 正體中文 (繁體) Menu Cambridge Dictionary Dictionary Translate Grammar Back to pronounce era home page Search Term Search Recent and Recommended Definitions and Grammar Clear explanations of natural written and spoken English English Learner’s Dictionary Essential British English Essential American English Grammar Translation Bilingual Dictionaries Click on the arrows to change the translation direction. English–Spanish Spanish–English English–French French–English English–German German–English English–Indonesian Indonesian–English Semi-bilingual Dictionaries English–Arabic English–Catalan English–Chinese (Simplified) English–Chinese (Traditional) English–Italian English–Japanese English–Korean English–Malaysian English–Polish English–Portuguese English–Russian English–Thai English–Turkish English–Vietnamese English pronunciation of “error” error ​ uk How to pronounce error in British English ​ us How to pronounce error in American English (English pronunciations

Links Write Us The Grammarphobia Blog How do you pronounce “err”? June 23rd, 2014 Q: When I pronounced the verb “err” to rhyme with “hair,”

Error Definition

a friend (a retired schoolteacher) corrected me and said it rhymes with “her.” Is she correct? A: The word “err,” meaning to be in error or make a mistake, has two acceptable pronunciations in American English. It can rhyme with either “her” or “hair.” If you’re British, however, you don’t have a choice—all the standard British dictionaries we’ve checked list only one pronunciation—the one that rhymes http://dictionary.cambridge.org/pronunciation/english/error with “her.” As it turns out, the original pronunciation was AIR. The ER pronunciation, a later development, eventually became dominant and is still regarded as the “traditional” one by many. But in the last half-century or so, AIR has made a comeback. A note in the online Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary adds some perspective here. Originally, according to M-W, the initial vowel of both “err” and “error” http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2014/06/err.html rhymed with AIR. But over time, the dictionary adds, “err” also developed the ER pronunciation. A similar thing happened with the words “curt,” “word,” “bird,” and “were,” which originally had distinctly different vowel sounds that are now pronounced as ER. Why did this happen? Because of the presence of “r.” As the dictionary says, “The sound of the letter r often colors a preceding vowel in English.” In the case of “err,” the note continues, “Commentators have expressed a visceral dislike for the original pronunciation [AIR]; perhaps they believe that once usage has established a new pronunciation for a word there can be no going back.” But, the editors conclude, “no sound reason prevents us from accepting again the [AIR] pronunciation of err, which is today also the more common variant in American speech.” Today, you’ll find ER and AIR accepted as equal variants in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (5th ed.), Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.), and Webster’s New World College Dictionary (4th ed.), among others. However, standard British dictionaries (like some older Americans who were brought up in the ER tradition) still regard ER as the only acceptable way to say “er

Common pronunciation errors in Englishby Jakub Marian Tip: See my guide to the Most Common Pronunciation Errors in https://jakubmarian.com/common-pronunciation-errors-in-english/ English. It will teach you about commonly mispronounced words, pro­nunci­ation patterns, and the basics of English phonology. We all have a mother tongue which functions as a filter for http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23927130 what sounds we are able to distinguish. When you learn a foreign language, you have to understand that it uses a different set of sounds and different orthographic pronunciation of rules than your mother tongue (i.e. the same letter written in a different language may be pronounced differently). What learners often do is that they try to approximate the sounds by the ones they are already familiar with and read words as if they were written in their native languages. Here's a list of the most pronunciation of error common errors of this type: au in English is pronounced as /ɔː/ (as "aw" in "law"), not as /au/, as in many other languages; for example "auto-" is pronounced /ɔːtə/, as in "autobiography" /ˌɔtəbaɪˈɒgrəfi/ (aw-tə-by-ogg-rə-fee) and "autopsy" /ˈɔːtɒpsi/ (aw-top-see). ps at the beginning of a word is pronounced just as /s/, such as in "psychology" /saɪˈkɒlədʒi/ (saai-koll-ə-dzhee) or "pseudonym" /ˈsjuːdənɪm/ (syoo-də-nim) (UK), /ˈsuːdənɪm/ (soo-də-nim) (US). eu unlike perhaps all other languages, "eu" in English is pronounced as /jʊ/ (mostly UK) or /ʊ/ (mostly US), and sometimes also long. Examples include "Euclid" /jʊˈklɪd/ (yu-klid), "pneumatic" /njuːˈmætɪk/ (nyoo-mæ-tik), or "neuron" /ˈnjʊərɒn/ (nyu-ə-ron) (that was the UK variant; US pronunciation of the latter two doesn't contain /j/). pn at the beginning of a word is pronounced as /n/, e.g. "pneumatic" (see above), "pneumonia" /njuːˈməʊniə/ (nyoo-moh-nee-ə) (UK), /nuːˈməʊniə/ (noo-moh-nee-ə) (US). kn at the beginning of a word is pronounced as /n/, e.g. "know" /nəʊ/ (noh), knee /niː/ (nee), knife /naɪf/ (naayf). x at the beginning of a word is pronounced as /z/,

& Bioassays Resources...DNA & RNABLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool)BLAST (Stand-alone)E-UtilitiesGenBankGenBank: BankItGenBank: SequinGenBank: tbl2asnGenome WorkbenchInfluenza VirusNucleotide DatabasePopSetPrimer-BLASTProSplignReference Sequence (RefSeq)RefSeqGeneSequence Read Archive (SRA)SplignTrace ArchiveUniGeneAll DNA & RNA Resources...Data & SoftwareBLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool)BLAST (Stand-alone)Cn3DConserved Domain Search Service (CD Search)E-UtilitiesGenBank: BankItGenBank: SequinGenBank: tbl2asnGenome ProtMapGenome WorkbenchPrimer-BLASTProSplignPubChem Structure SearchSNP Submission ToolSplignVector Alignment Search Tool (VAST)All Data & Software Resources...Domains & StructuresBioSystemsCn3DConserved Domain Database (CDD)Conserved Domain Search Service (CD Search)Structure (Molecular Modeling Database)Vector Alignment Search Tool (VAST)All Domains & Structures Resources...Genes & ExpressionBioSystemsDatabase of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP)E-UtilitiesGeneGene Expression Omnibus (GEO) Database Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) DatasetsGene Expression Omnibus (GEO) ProfilesGenome WorkbenchHomoloGeneMap ViewerOnline Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM)RefSeqGeneUniGeneAll Genes & Expression Resources...Genetics & MedicineBookshelfDatabase of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP)Genetic Testing RegistryInfluenza VirusMap ViewerOnline Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM)PubMedPubMed Central (PMC)PubMed Clinical QueriesRefSeqGeneAll Genetics & Medicine Resources...Genomes & MapsDatabase of Genomic Structural Variation (dbVar)GenBank: tbl2asnGenomeGenome ProjectGenome ProtMapGenome WorkbenchInfluenza VirusMap ViewerNucleotide DatabasePopSetProSplignSequence Read Archive (SRA)SplignTrace ArchiveAll Genomes & Maps Resources...HomologyBLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool)BLAST (Stand-alone)BLAST Link (BLink)Conserved Domain Database (CDD)Conserved Domain Search Service (CD Search)Genome ProtMapHomoloGeneProtein ClustersAll Homology Resources...LiteratureBookshelfE-UtilitiesJournals in NCBI DatabasesMeSH DatabaseNCBI HandbookNCBI Help ManualNCBI NewsPubMedPubMed Central (PMC)PubMed Clinical QueriesPubMed HealthAll Literature Resources...ProteinsBioSystemsBLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool)BLAST (Stand-alone)BLAST Link (BLink)Conserved Domain Database (CDD)Conserved Domain Search Service (CD Search)E-UtilitiesProSplignProtein ClustersProtein DatabaseReference Sequence (RefSeq)All Proteins Resources...Sequence AnalysisBLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool

 

Related content

No related pages.